Smoothie Recipe To Lower Cholesterol

Smoothie Recipe To Lower Cholesterol

So, let’s weep up a smoothie that lowers cholesterol on this page.

Using a cholesterol lowering smoothie is a nice way to use diet as a fighting weapon for high cholesterol problems. You need to lower your LDL-cholesterol, the so-called ‘bad cholesterol’ to protect your heart.

If your LDL-cholesterol is raised, your Total cholesterol will be raised too.
So, if you reduce your LDL-cholesterol level, you reduce your total cholesterol which is something we all want.

This cholesterol lowering smoothie recipe will be oat-based. One reason is; oats do contain a nice soluble fiber called beta-glucan.
You need soluble fiber like beta glucan in foods to help you deal with cholesterol problems.

Soluble fiber in foods helps form a gel with the aid of water. This gel acts as a cholesterol mop. It binds to the cholesterol delivered to the bowel from the liver, mops it up and escorts the cholesterol out with our faeces.

For this oats smoothie for cholesterol reduction, we’ll be getting a whopping 13 gm of soluble fiber. Not bad!

So, what do we need for this cholesterol reducing smoothie recipe?

Ingredients:

Rolled Oats x quarter cup
Ground flaxseeds x 5 tbs (50 gm)
Strawberries x 200 gm (8 good size strawberries)
Mango x three-quarter of a big mango
Oat milk x half a cup

 

cholesterol lowering smoothie ingredients

 

How To Make the Oats Cholesterol Lowering Smoothie

This is as simple as it gets.
Pour in the rolled oats, and the ground flaxseeds into the Nutribullet cup.

Add the strawberries into the cup. Then add the sliced mango pieces.
Now pour in the oat milk and blitz the content in the Nutribullet container.

You can add more oat milk if the smoothie turns out to be too thick.
Make it to the consistency you are happy with.

Now enjoy your cholesterol busting smoothie. Have it about 4 times a week along with good exercise and you will see your bad cholesterol begin to decline.

**Something else and very important too**

When you consume this smoothie, please ensure you drink enough water throughout the day. This smoothie requires good enough water consumption to have it well optimized.

Do let me know how you get on with the smoothie, if you can, through the comment section below

Spirulina and Vitamin B12 – Know The Risks

Spirulina and Vitamin B12 – Know The Risks

Let’s talk spirulina and vitamin B12.

I was someone who used to hoover up spirulina at least about 3 times a week. You really cannot blame me.

It was one of those superfoods that blitzed into our lives. After all, I wanted to be healthy. I was seeking good health.

Show me a superfood with nice health benefits and I will be all over it like a rash.

Spirulina was one of those foods just like dried purple laver (Nori). I used it because it’s an algae food.

At the time, I was strictly vegan and I wasn’t using any vitamin B12 supplements. But my dalliance with spirulina came to an end when I found out a shocking truth regarding spirulina and vitamin B12.

Why did my relationship with spirulina end?

Keep reading to find out…

Old thinking

Plant sources of Vitamin B12 are rare. Quite rare.

Spirulina was one of those foods that was considered a viable plant source of Vitamin B12.
That was old thinking.

The thing about science and nutrition is that the landscape keeps changing.
And that’s a good thing.

What was true yesterday will not be considered true today. And that’s because research does uncover new grounds, new discoveries.

You have to be prepared to change your position as science evolves around you. Otherwise you’ll be left behind.

Sometimes with devastating consequences.
And that’s the case with spirulina and vitamin B12.

spirulina vitamin b12

 

New thinking about Spirulina and Vitamin B12

Spirulina is not a good source of vitamin B12. Period.

Yes, it is true that spirulina does contain vitamin B12. But recent research has shown that the vitamin B12 in spirulina is not the genuine vitamin B12.

The vitamin B12 in spirulina is a pseudovitamin. Pseudovitamin B12 is the B12 in spirulina. This is not the real vitamin B12. This is a vitamin B12 analogue.

Some people will describe the vitamin B12 in spirulina as a fake vitamin B12. “Fake” is a strong word to use but it sort of fits the descriptive purpose of spirulina vitamin B12.

 

What is wrong with the vitamin B12 in spirulina?

Here’s what’s wrong with the vitamin B12 in spirulina. The pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina is a competitor to the real vitamin B12.

It will compete for the receptor sites with the real vitamin B12. And that competition happens at the level of the small intestine meaning the real vitamin B12 will not get absorbed into the bloodstream.

Because the pesudovitamin B12 will take up the receptor sites responsible for transporting the real vitamin b12 from the small intestine into the bloodstream.

The reason for this competition is the pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina being an analogue means the structure of both the pesudovitamin B12 and the real vitamin B12 are similar.

The competition for receptor sites doesn’t end there. Even in target sites in tissues where vitamin B12 is needed, there will still be competition between the two vitamin B12 molecules.

 

What are the consequences of using spirulina for your vitamin B12 needs?

Competition between the pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina and the real vitamin B12 means you’ll end up with vitamin B12 deficiency.

What if I take vitamin B12 supplements along with my spirulina?

Taking vitamin B12 with your spirulina will be a complete waste of time and money.

Because the pseudo-vitamin B12 in spirulina will still compete with vitamin B12 in your supplement for receptor sites.

That will reduce the bioavailability of the vitamin B12 from your supplements.

You’ll still end up with all the consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Don’t forget vitamin B12 from really good sources is poorly absorbed anyway.

Only a small percentage of the vitamin B12 that we consume is absorbed. Taking a food that provides a competitor for the genuine vitamin B12 will simply make the already precarious situation worse.

spirulina b12

 

Why won’t the vitamin B12 in spirulina do the work of the real vitamin B12?

Well despite the similarity of the structures of the pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina and the real vitamin B12, the pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina is not effective in humans.

The pseudovitamin B12 in spirulina is inactive in humans.
Spirulina vitamin B12 is not bioavailable.

Hence, it does not perform the same functions in the human body as the real vitamin B12 from animal sources or supplements.

Bottom line is:
You should stop using spirulina as a food product forthwith unless of course you’d like to have the consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Consequences like megaloblastic anaemia, significant neurological effects like degeneration of your spinal cord (which may be irreversible), psychiatric effects, cardiovascular effects like heart attacks and strokes etc.

As for spirulina, it is best left on the shelf, folks. Don’t bother with it.

Get your vitamin B12 either from animal sources or from vitamin B12 supplements.

Those sources are your best bet as far as fulfilling your Vitamin B12 needs.

Enjoyed this article? Say something below in the comments section

7 Steps To Lower Colon Cancer Risk

7 Steps To Lower Colon Cancer Risk

Colon cancer is the 3rd most common cancer in the US and it’s the 4th most common in the UK.

So, being so high up in the cancer leader board means taking steps to reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer can only be a good thing.

In this article you are going to get 7 ways to lower your colon cancer risk.

 

Is colon cancer preventable?

The answer to that question is; yes it is. Colon cancer is preventable. In fact, of all the cancers that afflict the human race, colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable cancers out there.

The reason colon cancer is quite preventable is because of the nature of its beginnings.

Most colon cancers usually start of as little growths (what we call polyps) on the inner lining of the large bowel (colon).

And that’s a good thing because if you catch the growth early enough, you can prevent the polyp from becoming cancerous.

 

prevent colon cancer

 

So, how can I prevent colon cancer or colorectal cancer?

I will give you 7 steps you can employ to reduce your risk of developing colon cancer. And the good news is that the steps are not that hard.

The measures to reduce colorectal cancer risks are simple strategies. It just takes a little effort and dedication on your part.

Let’s go…

Colon cancer prevention strategy #1

Screening – By far the best thing you can do to prevent colorectal cancer is screening.

You need to submit yourself to the screening available in your locality.

Screening for colorectal cancer comes in 2 forms:

  • Non-invasive
  • Invasive

By invasiveness we mean the degree to which a test intrudes your biological being.

How a test invades your physical body. Any test that requires medical instruments being inserted inside your body in one form or another is an invasive test.

On the other hand any test where the diagnostic instrument does not involve insertion of a medical instrument is a non-invasive test.

So, submitting urine for testing, for instance, is non-invasive because you simply pee into a pot and you hand it over to the Nurse and your test is processed.

But if you have to undergo say, laparoscopy (key hole investigative operation), that is an invasive test because an instrument is being inserted into your body cavity.

Anyway back to the screening tests for colon cancer.

Non-invasive colon cancer screening tests:

1. Stool test – simply submit your stool for lab testing. If it is negative for occult blood, you are fine. If it is positive, further testing will be required.

2. Virtual Colonography – also called CT Colonoscopy. This is a simple test where you have a CT scan of your colon and any polyps seen will require further investigation. It is very important that your bowel is well prepared for this test to avoid false positives. This means your bowel must be thoroughly cleansed prior to the procedure being undertaken.

Invasive colon cancer screening tests:

When any of the non-invasive tests are performed and are positive, this will usually lead to invasive testing.

I refer to the non-invasive tests as testing for further testing. A positive non-invasive test should trigger further testing by invasive test.

What are the invasive screening tests for colon cancer?

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy – a flexible instrument called sigmoidoscope is inserted into your lower bowel through the anus and that area up to the upper part of the lower colon is thoroughly inspected.

If any polyps are seen, they are resected.

Colonoscopy – this is similar to the flexible sigmoidoscopy but in colonoscopy, the entire colon is inspected from the anus to the earlier part of the large bowel (colon).

See video below on this page for description.

As usual, any polyps seen during the inspection are resected. Any resected polyp is sent to the lab for testing to exclude cancer in the lesion.

Why do I say screening is the best thing you can do to prevent colon cancer?

It is because cancers of the colon start off as small polyps and they are usually benign at the beginning. They gradually turn cancerous over time.

However, the progression from benign to cancer is not immediate. There is a progression scale. And this is from benign to precancerous before becoming cancerous.

So, to prevent colon cancer is to catch them at the stage before they become cancerous. Because once you resect the polyps at that stage, they stand no chance of becoming cancerous.

You have resected a potentially cancerous polyp. End of story.

Catching them early is key to survival.

And the only way to catch them early is to screen early. Opinion is divided as to what age screening should start.

how to prevent colon cancer

Some countries start screening at the age of 55. Some others 50.

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening from 50 up to age 75. Beyond 75, that would have to be a decision between your doctor and yourself.

In the UK, the screening age appears to be 55 according to the NHS website.

However I know one or two people who are 55 and over and are yet to be invited for colon cancer screening test in the UK. There’s probably some sort of Post Code lottery involved.

Will it be more beneficial to screen people for bowel cancer before their 50th birthday?

Yes, there’s certainly an argument for that. This study from Austria seems to suggest that bringing the screening age down to 40 is a good idea, at least for men anyway.

Because the ‘Number Needed to Screen’ and detect Advanced Adenomas (precancerous changes) among men aged 40 to 49 years was similar to that of women aged 50 to 59 years.

So, bringing down the screening age for men to 40 was beneficial. It remains for the Health Authorities to listen and pay attention to this important finding in the study involving 44,350 participants.

Are you beginning to see the importance of screening in whatever form as being the best colorectal cancer preventative strategy out there?

Colon cancer prevention strategy #2

Use of daily low-dose Aspirin.

Aspirin is a blood thinning agent. It is usually prescribed as a daily pill to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Some studies suggest that in individuals who are at risk of cardiovascular disease, using a low-dose aspirin daily reduces their risk of developing colorectal cancer.

However, not everyone qualifies for this. The age group 50 – 59 are best suited for the use of aspirin for prevention of colon cancer.

This is the age group that the US Preventive Services Task Force feels the benefits of taking daily low-dose aspirin (also called baby aspirin) outweighs the risk.

Users of daily dose aspirin for colon cancer must however commit to taking it daily and for 10 continuous years to see the benefits.

Some research like this one suggests that aspirin use prevents cancer more in the proximal colon (the earlier part of the colon) than the later part which is the rectal area.

The importance of aspirin use in colo-rectal cancer prevention goes beyond primary prevention.

Aspirin is also useful for secondary prevention of colorectal cancer. This research concludes that regular daily aspirin use is associated with lower risk of recurrence of the cancer and a lower risk of dying from the cancer.

Have a conversation with your doctor to see if you’ll be a suitable candidate for daily aspirin use.

Colon Cancer prevention strategy #3

Eat a high fiber diet

Fiber is generally good for your health and that includes prevention of colorectal cancer. Having a high fiber diet prevents constipation. Moving your bowel regularly is a cleansing action in itself.

Nitrosamines are carcinogenic. The longer toxins like nitrosamines hang around your large bowel in particular, the distal part of the large bowel (colon) the higher the likelihood of harm.

So, getting rid of toxins in your stool regularly will potentially prevent nitrosamines and other toxins from inducing cell changes that can lead to polyps and cancers later on.

One way to do achieve regular bowel movement is by eating a high fiber diet. This study supports the view that a high fiber diet reduces the incidence of colorectal cancer in the later part of the bowel.

Colon cancer prevention strategy #4

Avoiding processed meat and red meat

If you cannot avoid processed meat and red neat, you should at least reduce your consumption of both. Processed meat in particular is usually impregnated with nitrates to preserve the meat and to enhance their flavour.

The nitrates in the processed meat get converted to Nitroso-N-compounds with nitrosamines being the most common.

In the presence of the heme factor in processed meats like salami, bacon, chorizos, sausages, hot dogs etc and red meat too, there’s an upregulation of the nitrosamines produced from these animal products.

The net result is an avalanche of nitrosamines in the colon. This is potentially carcinogenic.

Best avoided. If you can’t, you must reduce your consumption of processed or red meat to less than 50 gm per day or at worst 70 gm per day

Harm is more likely if you exceed that threshold.

Colon cancer prevention strategy #5

Avoid tobacco

Is there any cancer that tobacco has not been implicated in?
This is just sensible advice. Tobacco does you no good and using tobacco does not certainly do you any good in colon cancer prevention. Avoid!

Colon cancer prevention strategy #6

Limit consumption of alcohol

I know you love your drink. Excessive alcohol consumption is bad news all round.
How about you limit your drinking to less than moderate levels.

Doing so will reduce or lower your colon cancer risk amongst other benefits.
Going teetotal is even better.

Colon cancer prevention strategy #7

Regular exercise.

The concept of doing 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per week is one way of reducing your colorectal cancer risk.

Or doing 75 minutes of vigorous exercise.

Either way you’ll be doing your health a whole bunch of good including reducing your risk of colon cancer.

If anything, regular exercise will keep your weight in check. Lean body mass will be preserved. Excess body fat is a cancer risk all round.

Hopefully you got some benefit from reading this piece.

Leave your comments below if you can. Remember to get yourself screened. The best thing you can do to help yourself prevent colorectal cancer.

 

Nitrates In Vegetables Vs Meat – Are Nitrates in Food Good or Bad for Your Health?

Nitrates In Vegetables Vs Meat – Are Nitrates in Food Good or Bad for Your Health?

By Dr Joe

Let’s talk about nitrates in vegetables versus meat. Are the nitrates in vegetables Vs meat bad for you? Or are these nitrates good for you?

Is there a difference to how our bodies treat and interact with the nitrates in vegetables Vs nitrates in meat? Which of these nitrates is safer to eat? is it better to eat vegetables because of the nitrates and should we avoid meat because of the nitrates in meat?

nitrates in vegetables vs meat

I will endeavour to answer all of these questions in this article.

There has always been this debate about nitrates in food. We are all too concerned about our health these days and for good reason too. I’d like to know if what I am eating, especially on a regular basis, is good for my health. Or is it possible I’m unwittingly damaging my health.

Time for “travelling in the dark” is far gone. The first thing to note is that; there are nitrates in both plant produce and animal products.

Full disclosure

I should say this upfront. I eat a plant-based diet.

But that is not to say, I don’t eat meat. I eat meat, fish and plants but I limit how much meat I eat. So, this article is not written with a vegan bias or anything like that because I am a full-blown flexitarian.

 

What’s the deal with these Nitrates and Nitrites in our food?

Nitrates are naturally occurring in plant food produce but in animal foods, they are artificially added to preserve these foods.

Nitrates are relatively harmless on their own. It is when they get converted to their subunits that the potential to cause harm arises.

Nitrates have 3 oxygen molecules attached to the Nitrogen atom.

However, nitrates become bioactive when one of the oxygen atoms is removed leaving 2 oxygen atoms attached to the Nitrogen atom. A Nitrogen atom with 2 oxygen molecules instead of 3 becomes a Nitrite.

nitrate conversion to nitrite

So, the bioactive form of Nitrate is the Nitrite.

This conversion from Nitrate to Nitrite is trigerred by bacteria, fermentation, acid in the gut and ensuing enzymatic activity. And that enzymatic activity begins in the mouth.

Why Nitrates are good for you?

This breakdown of Nitrate does not stop at the Nitrite step.

Listen:

If you have ever pondered the question: are nitrates in vegetables bad for you?
Well, you are going to love this analysis below because; it explains why nitrates in vegetables are not bad for you. It will encourage you to eat more vegetables, if anything.

Here it is:
The Nitrite from the nitrate is further broken down to 2 other potential compounds – Nitric Oxide and Nitrosamines (N-Nitroso compounds als